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English 11b Unit 4 Contemporary Postmodernism VERIFIED



ENG 0069 Contemporary Multi-Ethnic Literature. This course explores the various ways that recent writers and visual media artists from disparate communities of color in the United States articulate resistance and envision community in or through their work. We will explore examples in literature, film, and television to consider how and for whom these contemporary US texts represent race, gender, sexuality, power, and citizenship. Readings will also include essays and journalistic writing in conjunction with literary and visual materials. This course fulfills the post-1860 English requirement.




English 11b Unit 4 Contemporary Postmodernism



In 1995, he constructed a postmodern gatehouse pavilion for his residence, Glass House. The gatehouse, called "Da Monstra", is 23 feet high, made of gunite, or concrete shot from a hose, colored gray and red. It is a piece of sculptural architecture with no right angles and very few straight lines, a predecessor of the sculptural contemporary architecture of the 21st century.[10]


"Being in the Universe" considers three fundamental questions of human existence from both humanistic and scientific perspectives: (1) What is the nature of our universe, and to what extent are creatures like ourselves a predictable consequence of it? (2) What is the nature of time, and what does it mean to be a conscious being living our lives through time? (3) What would it mean for humans to be alone in the Galaxy or the universe, or alternatively, not alone? "Being in the Universe" is an integrative GH+GN GenEd course. The course's three major units cover the following topics: (1) We discuss cosmology and religion as human enterprises, as well as the history of science; (2) We study the basic scientific theory of the Big Bang universe, and consider its implications for human life; (3) We address contemporary theories of the multiverse from scientific, philosophical, and literary perspectives; (4) We consider the thermodynamic and relativistic theories of time, and the basic philosophical approaches to time, and discuss the implications of these for our ordinary human experience of the past, present, and future; (5) We discuss the history of life in the universe, the possibility of life on other planets, and the social, religious, and imaginative reactions to those possibilities in literature and film.


This course surveys the institutions and social networks in which European fine arts were created, consumed and critiqued. Beginning with the medieval period and ranging to the early 20th century, the course will examine the variety of communities where public and private often intersected and which sponsored innovations in the arts. Often indexing social movements and political change, such communities include convents and cathedrals, royal academies and courts, coffee houses, salons, and theaters. Artists, performers, patrons, politicians, journalists, and others collaborated and competed in these spaces. Such communities could embody political and economic power, or foster resistance to it. This approach to the history of the arts in western culture puts the focus less on the individual creative genius of great composers, writers, painters, and sculptors, and more on the social exchanges and institutions that sponsored and received their work. Such an approach brings to light particularly the ways in which women played significant roles in the production and reception of culture: as salon hostesses, patronesses, and divas, women often enabled and enacted cultural production. Some examples of particular units of study might include: the German convent of Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179), where monophonic chant and allegorical morality plays developed; the Mantuan (Italy) court of Isabella d'Este ,the first lady of the world, (1474-1539) where the roots of the madrigal began and where notable painters found support and sponsorship; the French salons of Mme. Geoffrin (1699-1777) and Mme. de Staël (1766-1817); and the student residences in Madrid where avant-garde writers and artists interacted. Each unit will also consider the relationships between the aesthetic norms and values of a period and the economic and political realities of sponsorship. The course will require that students attend at least one musical performance or concert held on campus during the semester and complete a brief writing project based on that experience. This requirement will encourage students to think about their own university as a contemporary space of cultural sponsorship.


Comparative exploration of various Buddhist literary cultures, from the classical Indian subcontinent to modern movements like the Beats and dalit writing. CMLIT 448 Literary Cultures of Buddhism (3) (IL)This course will provide an in-depth exploration of various cultures of Buddhist literary production. Readings will cover a broad temporal and geographical range. Prior study of Buddhism or literature is not required and materials will be in English. Students will learn about major genres of Buddhist literature, such as sutras (scripture), j'taka (stories of the Buddha's previous incarnations), hagiography, miracle tales, religiously inspired poetry, and k?an meditational riddles. The course will also examine the various forms into which contemporary authors have adapted these materials (such as manga, novels, memoirs, and film). The course, or individual units within the course, will be structured so that students develop an historical perspective, allowing them to understand the literary cultures that gave rise to the works under study. Class work includes some lecture but emphasizes guided discussions, group work, writing exercises, and some student presentations. This participatory approach is intended to deepen students' appreciation of the works, to help them understand value systems that may differ from those predominant in western cultures, and to assist students in developing both analytical and expressive abilities. The course is designed to be suitable for all students generally interested in religious cultures of writing, in Buddhism, or in literature, whether or not they have previously studied in any of these areas. The Comparative Literature major requires a certain number of electives at the 400-level, of which this could be one, depending on its content. Further, the course is designed to count as General Education and as an IL ("International") course. It will be taught, as feasible, every 2-3 years with an enrollment of 20-30 students. With the addition of supplementary reading and research assignments, the course may also be suitable for certain graduate students. This course would benefit from access to a laptop and digital projector.


This special graduate seminar, funded by the Mellon Early Modern Research Initiative, will bring four leading scholars of early modern European history and culture from different disciplines to investigate various modes ofreproduction in the early modern world - including but not limited to intellectual, artistic, scientific, material, sexual, ideological, and political - in light of recent critical and theoretical scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. This interdisciplinary seminar is not only an exciting chance to study closely with a range of nationally renowned scholar-teachers, it is also a unique opportunity to learn how these cutting edge scholars assemble and develop a scholarly project, since all scholars will be teaching material from their current book projects. Our guests will be: Jeffrey Masten (English, Northwestern), Katherine Paugh (History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), David Glimp (English, University of Colorado-Boulder), and Barbara Fuchs (UCLA, Spanish & Portuguese and English).The seminar format is as follows: students will read and discuss recent and in-progress work by our distinguished guests, each of whom will then visit with the seminar to discuss their current research and its relationship to its own field and to interdisciplinary scholarship. The seminar sessions will explore connections across disciplines and modes of reproduction, asking questions like: What kinds of educational methods does the early modern Spanish empire use to produce and reproduce colonial subjects? How did early modern England develop bio-political and governmental discourses in order to rationalize and manage its exploding population? How might the practices and representations of midwifery in the early modern Atlantic relate to the production and reproduction of racial and gender hierarchies? How can contemporary queer critical debates about kinship and marriage be brought to bear on the historically distant sex/gender system of the Renaissance?This course is designed to appeal to students doing coursework as well as those preparing to write or writing dissertations. Students doing coursework will have the opportunity to study the politics of reproduction across a broad cultural and geographical swath of early modern Europe and the Atlantic, while also receiving training in critical methodologies pertaining to the study of embodiment, gender, sexuality, empire, bio-politics, governmentality, literary history, and the history of medicine. Advanced graduate students will have a rare chance to learn from major scholars in the field how to envision and execute a compelling, complex, and complete scholarly project. Students also have the option of taking this course for two or three hours of credit under the rubric of Humanities 298. If you choose this option, please email Professor Friedlander so he can send you the CRN for the seminar. Students who wish to audit unofficially are also welcome to do so, and should contact Professor Friedlander directly (arifriedlander AT ucdavis.edu) for details.Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.Texts:


This special graduate seminar, funded by the Mellon Early Modern Research Initiative, will bring four leading scholars of early modern European history and culture from different disciplines to investigate various modes ofreproduction in the early modern world - including but not limited to intellectual, artistic, scientific, material, sexual, ideological, and political - in light of recent critical and theoretical scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. This interdisciplinary seminar is not only an exciting chance to study closely with a range of nationally renowned scholar-teachers, it is also a unique opportunity to learn how these cutting edge scholars assemble and develop a scholarly project, since all scholars will be teaching material from their current book projects. Our guests will be: Jeffrey Masten (English, Northwestern), Katherine Paugh (History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), David Glimp (English, University of Colorado-Boulder), and Barbara Fuchs (UCLA, Spanish & Portuguese and English).The seminar format is as follows: students will read and discuss recent and in-progress work by our distinguished guests, each of whom will then visit with the seminar to discuss their current research and its relationship to its own field and to interdisciplinary scholarship. The seminar sessions will explore connections across disciplines and modes of reproduction, asking questions like: What kinds of educational methods does the early modern Spanish empire use to produce and reproduce colonial subjects? How did early modern England develop bio-political and governmental discourses in order to rationalize and manage its exploding population? How might the practices and representations of midwifery in the early modern Atlantic relate to the production and reproduction of racial and gender hierarchies? How can contemporary queer critical debates about kinship and marriage be brought to bear on the historically distant sex/gender system of the Renaissance?This course is designed to appeal to students doing coursework as well as those preparing to write or writing dissertations. Students doing coursework will have the opportunity to study the politics of reproduction across a broad cultural and geographical swath of early modern Europe and the Atlantic, while also receiving training in critical methodologies pertaining to the study of embodiment, gender, sexuality, empire, bio-politics, governmentality, literary history, and the history of medicine. Advanced graduate students will have a rare chance to learn from major scholars in the field how to envision and execute a compelling, complex, and complete scholarly project. Students also have the option of taking this course for two or three hours of credit under the rubric of Humanities 298. If you choose this option, please email Professor Friedlander so he can send you the CRN for the seminar. Students who wish to audit unofficially are also welcome to do so, and should contact Professor Friedlander directly (arifriedlander AT ucdavis.edu) for details.Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper. (S/U grading only)Texts: